Basel Report

Basel Report

The Ananta Diver's Chronograph
March 27, 2011

At the center of the SEIKO stand stands a single showcase with a single watch. It is the new, limited edition Ananta mechanical diver's watch and it has been attracting considerable interest here at Baselworld this week.

The Ananta Automatic Diver, SEIKO 130th Anniversary Edition Dial is in real black "Urushi" or japan lacquer
The Ananta Automatic Diver, SEIKO 130th Anniversary Edition
Dial is in real black "Urushi" or japan lacquer

The media representatives were astonished by the purity and strength of the sound of the chimes, made possible by the silence of the Spring Drive mechanism and the use of a ‘silent governor' which uses the viscosity of air to regulate the intervals between the chimes.

The Ananta Diver's Chronograph

The Ananta Diver's Chronograph

The Ananta Diver's Chronograph

Ananta
Watch the movie

Two years ago, a Japanese "Katana" sword was displayed together with the very first Ananta collection to communicate the inspiration of the design. Last year, a "Kogetsudai" display featuring the moon presented the Ananta Spring Drive Moon Phase. This year, the theme of Japanese traditional craftsmanship and beauty is once again highlighted in the presentation of the new Ananta diver’s chronograph with its exquisite, hand painted lacquer dial. A screen next to the watch inside the showcase shows a film of the lacquer artist, Isshu Tamura painting and polishing the dial by hand.

The Ananta Diver's Chronograph
Ananta Diver’s displayed with bamboo work(left)
and Kaga Makie work(right)

The new Ananta has a new case which retains the Katana inspiration of the collection, but which has a new construction and a new contour that is shaped to the wrist. It houses a mechanical caliber specially strengthened for diving use, with stronger bridges, a new spring made from SEIKO’s proprietary alloy, SPRON610, for increased shock and magnetism resistance, and the movement is affixed by three clamps instead of the more normal two so as to protect it securely.

But it is the lacquer dial that gives the watch its special appeal, and it is not merely beautiful; it has an important function. Legibility at depth in the sea is essential for divers.

The particular Japanese lacquer chosen for the dial is of a deep and pure black and provides perfect contrast and thereby enhanced legibility. In Japan, the expression "as black as lacquer," is widely used. The new Ananta, Thanks to the master craftsman, Mr. Isshu Tamura, the world can now see just what the expression means.